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Student Jobs: Register via Rent-A-Student

Typically, the jobs listed are a few hours and/or 1-3 days in duration, though sometimes the jobs listed are longer term opportunities.

Work is varied, with over 125 different Job Categories including many work from home type jobs e.g. transcription services, accountancy type services, web design, blogging etc.

In 2014-15, Rent-a-Student were selected and were finalists in the Sage 702 Small Business Awards and, as a registered not for profit company have accreditations with Google Non-Profit, Microsoft Bizspark and The Sage Foundation.

As a registered not for profit organisation, Rent-a-Student is able to secure students the best part time rates per hour (typically over R50).

Employers recognize the work done by Rent-a-Student and are willing to pay a little more per job than normal as they are helping students gain work experience and providing them with additional funds for study or family commitments.

For students, who in some cases, may need to work to meet educational and living expenses, the skills obtained from working complement academic performance and communicate to future employers an ability to succeed in a professional setting.

Studies have shown that students who take part time jobs do just as well or better academically than non-working students and grades improve as students work more hours per week (up to 20).

In addition, working students are more likely to complete a degree program than non-workers.

Benefits to working in a student job

• Acquire valuable work experience for your résumé.
• Reduce necessity for student loans.
• Opportunity for networking with professionals.
• Opportunity to sample different career choices.
• Valuable and practical career-related experiences.
• Exposure to the world of work.
• Opportunity to enhance fundamental work skills.

• Develop a sense of community and involvement with other students.

Recently, Rent-a-Student have partnered with several service providers to offer students products and services that will be of benefit to them.

For example, we have partnered with an e-learning company to offer students a qualification in promotions.

The course is already reduced in price and helps them gain a skill that they can use as we provided hundreds of promoters a month.

We also allow students to repay the fees over time using monies earned from future part time jobs states John Ashcroft, Founder at Rent-a-Student.

Another initiative just launched is a dedicated Student Car Pooling / Sharing scheme offered in conjunction with Jump In Rides.

Here students can offer spaces or request a lift to/from campus or events or jobs.

Ultimately, they can make a little money as a registered driver and/or they can save money by sharing costs.

Later on this year, Rent-a-Student will be launching more products to help students with expenses and study loans.

How to Register

Click Here to Register at Rent-A-Student

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How to Become a Traffic Cop in South Africa

How to become a Traffic Cop in South Africa

1. WHY IS THE CAREER OF A TRAFFIC OFFICER SO IMPORTANT?

Traffic officers enforce the road rules and signs.

They ensure a safe passage in traffic and that all road users – including pedestrians – use our roads in an orderly and safe manner.

The main purpose of traffic officers is to ensure the safe and free flow of traffic to prevent road crashes and deaths on our roads.

2. WHAT DOES ONE DO IN THIS CAREER?

A distinction is made between provincial traffic officers and municipal traffic officers. Provincial traffic officers perform their duties within the boundaries of provinces, while municipal traffic officers perform theirs within the boundaries of municipalities.

Provincial traffic officers are also known as provincial inspectors.

They enforce compliance of the National Road Traffic Act, National Land Transport Act and Administrative Adjudication of Road Traffic Offences Act.

They control traffic, inspect vehicles for roadworthiness, and enforce road traffic signs and the rules of the road.

3. WHAT WILL THE WORKPLACE BE LIKE?

Provincial inspectors and traffic officers spend most of their working hours outdoors on the road.

A small portion of their time is spent in courtrooms and offices doing administrative duties.

They do their patrol duties mainly in motorcars, although some of their duties are performed on motorcycles or on foot.

4. WHAT INSTRUMENTS, TOOLS OR MATERIALS WILL ONE WORK WITH?

Traffic officers are responsible for law enforcement.

They will be working with a speed-measuring apparatus, an alcohol test apparatus, measuring tapes, mass-measuring apparatus, a summons book, infringement notices, etc.

5. WHAT ARE THE ADVANTAGES AND DRAWBACKS OF THIS CAREER?

Advantages: Working with people and helping them to obey traffic rules, assisting to reduce the number of road crashes and thus saving lives.

Drawbacks: The need to be able to work with people with difficult personalities, having to work during holidays and on weekends, and performing duties in all different weather conditions.

6. HOW DO I BECOME A TRAFFIC OFFICER?

You will first need to be employed by provincial government, a municipality or a government entity such as the Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC) or the Cross Border Road Transport Agency.

Vacant posts are advertised by these authorities in the open media.

You will therefore need to constantly check your local or national newspapers.

You may also contact any local or provincial authority directly to enquire as to whether vacancies exist within the departments and when the relevant posts will be advertised.

7. WHAT ARE THE MINIMUM REQUIRE­MENTS TO BECOME A TRAFFIC OFFICER?

· South African citizenship;
· Grade 12 or equivalent;
· No criminal record;
· Code B driving Licence ( manual transmission);
· Medical certificate – that a person may do strenuous exercises; and

· Applicants shall not be older than 35 years of age.

8. WHERE DO I UNDERGO TRAINING AS A TRAFFIC OFFICER?

Once you are employed as a traffic officer /traffic trainee, you will be sent to one of the 12 traffic colleges approved by the Minister of Transport.

Only the traffic colleges and metro police academies in the table below may currently train traffic officers in South Africa.

9. WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A METRO POLICE OFFICER AND A TRAFFIC OFFICER?

Traffic officers undergo the basic traffic officer training and then commence with their duties.

Metro police officers are trained as traffic officers and thereafter on certain functions of police officers.

Therefore, before you can become a metro police officer, you must be trained and registered as a traffic officer. In addition to all their duties as traffic officers, metro police officers also focus on crime prevention and the enforcement of municipal by

10. CAN I STILL TRAIN ON MY OWN AS A TRAFFIC OFFICER, EVEN IF I AM NOT EMPLOYED?

Definitely not. However, you can study traffic management-related courses at various FET colleges or universities.

These courses may give you an advantage, should authorities or municipalities advertise traffic-related posts.

TRAFFICCOLLEGE

Please be informed that there are only 12 approved Traffic Training Colleges in South Africa (see above).

Only these colleges can issue a diploma with which a person can be registered as a traffic officer, in terms road traffic legislation.

Beware of any non-approved training service providers, who offer basic training in traffic or traffic-related aspects.

Z83 Form – CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD THE FORM

OR

Z83 Form – CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD THE FORM

Source: ArriveAlive.co.za

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How to Apply for Government Jobs-Internships and Traineeships

You’ve found the perfect job (or internship, or bursary) with a government department. Applying to government positions is a complicated process, so here’s a guide on how to apply to government jobs.

How To Apply To Government Postings – Jobs, Internships, Bursaries

So you’ve found a government job or internship or bursary you’re interested in and want to apply for it. The first thing you need to do is note down the reference number as stated in the advert.

Next, you need to get your hands on a Z83 form. The Z83 is the “Application for Employment” form and is designed to assist government departments in choosing the right person for the position. You can download one here, or get a copy from your nearest

Source: CareersPortal

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Unemployed Youth Workshop Department of Labour

The Department of Labour will host a two-day SADC workshop on youth unemployment in the region.

South Africa, as chair of the Southern African Development Community (SADC), will host the gathering under the theme ‘Addressing Youth Employment in the SADC Region’ from 13 – 14 February in Ekurhuleni, Gauteng. 

Youth unemployment is defined by the United Nations as unemployed young people between the ages of 15-25 years of age, who do not have a job but are actively seeking work. However, youth unemployment within the SADC region includes unemployed persons between the ages of 15-35 years old.

An estimated 71 million youth in the SADC region are said to be unemployed. SADC Labour Ministers have been mandated to come up with solutions to the growing problem.

The objective of this workshop is to establish a forum for employment services practitioners within the SADC Member States to share experiences and challenges, as well as come up with best practices on how to approach youth unemployment.

The workshop will start at 9am at Birchwood Conference Centre.

Source: SAnews.gov.za

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Are You Ready for The Next Job Interview: Test Yourself with These Common Interview Questions and Answers

It is important to prepare yourself for the next interview. Here below are the most common interview questions and suggested answers. What’s so much important is to understand the question before you answer.

1. Can you tell us about yourself?

This question seems simple, so many people fail to prepare for it, but it’s crucial. Here’s the deal: Don’t give your complete employment (or personal) history. Instead give a pitch—one that’s concise and compelling and that shows exactly why you’re the right fit for the job. Start off with the 2-3 specific accomplishments or experiences that you most want the interviewer to know about, then wrap up talking about how that prior experience has positioned you for this specific role.

2. How did you hear about the position?

Another seemingly innocuous question, this is actually a perfect opportunity to stand out and show your passion for and connection to the company. For example, if you found out about the gig through a friend or professional contact, name drop that person, then share why you were so excited about it. If you discovered the company through an event or article, share that. Even if you found the listing through a random job board, share what, specifically, caught your eye about the role.

3. What do you know about the company?

Any candidate can read and regurgitate the company’s “About” page. So, when interviewers ask this, they aren’t necessarily trying to gauge whether you understand the mission—they want to know whether you care about it. Start with one line that shows you understand the company’s goals, using a couple key words and phrases from the website, but then go on to make it personal. Say, “I’m personally drawn to this mission because…” or “I really believe in this approach because…” and share a personal example or two.

4. Why do you want this job?

Again, companies want to hire people who are passionate about the job, so you should have a great answer about why you want the position. (And if you don’t? You probably should apply elsewhere.) First, identify a couple of key factors that make the role a great fit for you (e.g., “I love customer support because I love the constant human interaction and the satisfaction that comes from helping someone solve a problem”), then share why you love the company (e.g., “I’ve always been passionate about education, and I think you guys are doing great things, so I want to be a part of it”).

5. Why should we hire you?

This question seems forward (not to mention intimidating!), but if you’re asked it, you’re in luck: There’s no better setup for you to sell yourself and your skills to the hiring manager. Your job here is to craft an answer that covers three things: that you can not only do the work, you can deliver great results; that you’ll really fit in with the team and culture; and that you’d be a better hire than any of the other candidates.

6. What are your greatest professional strengths?

When answering this question, interview coach Pamela Skillings recommends being accurate (share your true strengths, not those you think the interviewer wants to hear); relevant (choose your strengths that are most targeted to this particular position); and specific (for example, instead of “people skills,” choose “persuasive communication” or “relationship building”). Then, follow up with an example of how you’ve demonstrated these traits in a professional setting.

7. What do you consider to be your weaknesses?

What your interviewer is really trying to do with this question—beyond identifying any major red flags—is to gauge your self-awareness and honesty. So, “I can’t meet a deadline to save my life” is not an option—but neither is “Nothing! I’m perfect!” Strike a balance by thinking of something that you struggle with but that you’re working to improve. For example, maybe you’ve never been strong at public speaking, but you’ve recently volunteered to run meetings to help you be more comfortable when addressing a crowd.

8. What is your greatest professional achievement?

Nothing says “hire me” better than a track record of achieving amazing results in past jobs, so don’t be shy when answering this question! A great way to do so is by using the S-T-A-R method: Set up the situation and the task that you were required to complete to provide the interviewer with background context (e.g., “In my last job as a junior analyst, it was my role to manage the invoicing process”), but spend the bulk of your time describing what you actually did (the action) and what you achieved (the result). For example, “In one month, I streamlined the process, which saved my group 10 man-hours each month and reduced errors on invoices by 25%.”

9. Tell me about a challenge or conflict you’ve faced at work, and how you dealt with it.

In asking this question, “your interviewer wants to get a sense of how you will respond to conflict. Anyone can seem nice and pleasant in a job interview, but what will happen if you’re hired and Gladys in Compliance starts getting in your face?” says Skillings. Again, you’ll want to use the S-T-A-R method, being sure to focus on how you handled the situation professionally and productively, and ideally closing with a happy ending, like how you came to a resolution or compromise.

10. Where do you see yourself in five years?

If asked this question, be honest and specific about your future goals, but consider this: A hiring manager wants to know a) if you’ve set realistic expectations for your career, b) if you have ambition (a.k.a., this interview isn’t the first time you’re considering the question), and c) if the position aligns with your goals and growth. Your best bet is to think realistically about where this position could take you and answer along those lines. And if the position isn’t necessarily a one-way ticket to your aspirations? It’s OK to say that you’re not quite sure what the future holds, but that you see this experience playing an important role in helping you make that decision.

11. What’s your dream job?

Along similar lines, the interviewer wants to uncover whether this position is really in line with your ultimate career goals. While “an NBA star” might get you a few laughs, a better bet is to talk about your goals and ambitions—and why this job will get you closer to them.

12. What other companies are you interviewing with?

Companies ask this for a number of reasons, from wanting to see what the competition is for you to sniffing out whether you’re serious about the industry. “Often the best approach is to mention that you are exploring a number of other similar options in the company’s industry,” says job search expert Alison Doyle. “It can be helpful to mention that a common characteristic of all the jobs you are applying to is the opportunity to apply some critical abilities and skills that you possess. For example, you might say ‘I am applying for several positions with IT consulting firms where I can analyze client needs and translate them to development teams in order to find solutions to technology problems.’”

13. Why are you leaving your current job?

This is a toughie, but one you can be sure you’ll be asked. Definitely keep things positive—you have nothing to gain by being negative about your past employers. Instead, frame things in a way that shows that you’re eager to take on new opportunities and that the role you’re interviewing for is a better fit for you than your current or last position. For example, “I’d really love to be part of product development from beginning to end, and I know I’d have that opportunity here.” And if you were let go? Keep it simple: “Unfortunately, I was let go,” is a totally OK answer.

14. Why were you fired?

OK, if you get the admittedly much tougher follow-up question as to why you were let go (and the truth isn’t exactly pretty), your best bet is to be honest (the job-seeking world is small, after all). But it doesn’t have to be a deal-breaker. Share how you’ve grown and how you approach your job and life now as a result. If you can position the learning experience as an advantage for this next job, even better.

15. What are you looking for in a new position?

Hint: Ideally the same things that this position has to offer. Be specific.

16. What type of work environment do you prefer?

Hint: Ideally one that’s similar to the environment of the company you’re applying to. Be specific.

17. What’s your management style?

The best managers are strong but flexible, and that’s exactly what you want to show off in your answer. (Think something like, “While every situation and every team member requires a bit of a different strategy, I tend to approach my employee relationships as a coach…”) Then, share a couple of your best managerial moments, like when you grew your team from five to 15 or coached an underperforming employee to become the company’s top salesperson.

18. What’s a time you exercised leadership?

Depending on what’s more important for the the role, you’ll want to choose an example that showcases your project management skills (spearheading a project from end to end, juggling multiple moving parts) or one that shows your ability to confidently and effectively rally a team. And remember: “The best stories include enough detail to be believable and memorable,” says Skillings. “Show how you were a leader in this situation and how it represents your overall leadership experience and potential.”

19. What’s a time you disagreed with a decision that was made at work?

Everyone disagrees with the boss from time to time, but in asking this question, hiring managers want to know that you can do so in a productive, professional way. “You don’t want to tell the story about the time when you disagreed but your boss was being a jerk and you just gave in to keep the peace. And you don’t want to tell the one where you realized you were wrong,” says Peggy McKee of Career Confidential. “Tell the one where your actions made a positive difference on the outcome of the situation, whether it was a work-related outcome or a more effective and productive working relationship.”

20. How would your boss and co-workers describe you?

First of all, be honest (remember, if you get this job, the hiring manager will be calling your former bosses and co-workers!). Then, try to pull out strengths and traits you haven’t discussed in other aspects of the interview, such as your strong work ethic or your willingness to pitch in on other projects when needed.

21. Why was there a gap in your employment?

If you were unemployed for a period of time, be direct and to the point about what you’ve been up to (and hopefully, that’s a litany of impressive volunteer and other mind-enriching activities, like blogging or taking classes). Then, steer the conversation toward how you will do the job and contribute to the organization: “I decided to take a break at the time, but today I’m ready to contribute to this organization in the following ways.”

22. Can you explain why you changed career paths?

Don’t be thrown off by this question—just take a deep breath and explain to the hiring manager why you’ve made the career deicions you have. More importantly, give a few examples of how your past experience is transferrable to the new role. This doesn’t have to be a direct connection; in fact, it’s often more impressive when a candidate can make seemingly irrelevant experience seem very relevant to the role.

23. How do you deal with pressure or stressful situations?

“Choose an answer that shows that you can meet a stressful situation head-on in a productive, positive manner and let nothing stop you from accomplishing your goals,” says McKee. A great approach is to talk through your go-to stress-reduction tactics (making the world’s greatest to-do list, stopping to take 10 deep breaths), and then share an example of a stressful situation you navigated with ease.

24. What would your first 30, 60, or 90 days look like in this role?

Start by explaining what you’d need to do to get ramped up. What information would you need? What parts of the company would you need to familiarize yourself with? What other employees would you want to sit down with? Next, choose a couple of areas where you think you can make meaningful contributions right away. (e.g., “I think a great starter project would be diving into your email marketing campaigns and setting up a tracking system for them.”) Sure, if you get the job, you (or your new employer) might decide there’s a better starting place, but having an answer prepared will show the interviewer where you can add immediate impact—and that you’re excited to get started.

25. What are your salary requirements?

The #1 rule of answering this question is doing your research on what you should be paid by using sites like Payscale and Glassdoor. You’ll likely come up with a range, and we recommend stating the highest number in that range that applies, based on your experience, education, and skills. Then, make sure the hiring manager knows that you’re flexible. You’re communicating that you know your skills are valuable, but that you want the job and are willing to negotiate.

26. What do you like to do outside of work?

Interviewers ask personal questions in an interview to “see if candidates will fit in with the culture [and] give them the opportunity to open up and display their personality, too,” says longtime hiring manager Mitch Fortner. “In other words, if someone asks about your hobbies outside of work, it’s totally OK to open up and share what really makes you tick. (Do keep it semi-professional, though: Saying you like to have a few beers at the local hot spot on Saturday night is fine. Telling them that Monday is usually a rough day for you because you’re always hungover is not.)”

27. If you were an animal, which one would you want to be?

Seemingly random personality-test type questions like these come up in interviews generally because hiring managers want to see how you can think on your feet. There’s no wrong answer here, but you’ll immediately gain bonus points if your answer helps you share your strengths or personality or connect with the hiring manager. Pro tip: Come up with a stalling tactic to buy yourself some thinking time, such as saying, “Now, that is a great question. I think I would have to say… ”

28. How many tennis balls can you fit into a limousine?

1,000? 10,000? 100,000? Seriously?

Well, seriously, you might get asked brainteaser questions like these, especially in quantitative jobs. But remember that the interviewer doesn’t necessarily want an exact number—he wants to make sure that you understand what’s being asked of you, and that you can set into motion a systematic and logical way to respond. So, just take a deep breath, and start thinking through the math. (Yes, it’s OK to ask for a pen and paper!)

29. Are you planning on having children?

Questions about your family status, gender (“How would you handle managing a team of all men?”), nationality (“Where were you born?”), religion, or age, are illegal—but they still get asked (and frequently). Of course, not always with ill intent—the interviewer might just be trying to make conversation—but you should definitely tie any questions about your personal life (or anything else you think might be inappropriate) back to the job at hand. For this question, think: “You know, I’m not quite there yet. But I am very interested in the career paths at your company. Can you tell me more about that?”

30. What do you think we could do better or differently?

This is a common one at startups (and one of our personal favorites here at The Muse). Hiring managers want to know that you not only have some background on the company, but that you’re able to think critically about it and come to the table with new ideas. So, come with new ideas! What new features would you love to see? How could the company increase conversions? How could customer service be improved? You don’t need to have the company’s four-year strategy figured out, but do share your thoughts, and more importantly, show how your interests and expertise would lend themselves to the job.

31. Do you have any questions for us?

You probably already know that an interview isn’t just a chance for a hiring manager to grill you—it’s your opportunity to sniff out whether a job is the right fit for you. What do you want to know about the position? The company? The department? The team?

You’ll cover a lot of this in the actual interview, so have a few less-common questions ready to go. We especially like questions targeted to the interviewer (“What’s your favorite part about working here?”) or the company’s growth (“What can you tell me about your new products or plans for growth?”)

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